Applying physical science techniques and CERN technology to an unsolved problem in radiation treatment for cancer: the multidisciplinary ‘VoxTox’ research programme

Burnet, N., Scaife, J., Romanchikova, M., Thomas, S., Bates, A., Wong, E., Noble, D., Shelley, L., Bond, S., Forman, J., Hoole, A., Barnett, G., Brochu, F., Simmons, M., Jena, R., Harrison, K., Yeap, P., Drew, A., Silvester, E., Elwood, P., Pullen, H., Sultana, A., Seah, S., Wilson, M., Russell, S., Benson, R., Rimmer, Y., Jefferies, S., Taku, N., Gurnell, M., Powlson, A., Schönlieb, C., Cai, X., Sutcliffe, M., & Parker, M. (2017). Applying physical science techniques and CERN technology to an unsolved problem in radiation treatment for cancer: the multidisciplinary ‘VoxTox’ research programme. CERN IdeaSquare Journal Of Experimental Innovation, 1(1), 3.

Abstract

The VoxTox research programme has applied expertise from the physical sciences to the problem of radiotherapy toxicity, bringing together expertise from engineering, mathematics, high energy physics (including the Large Hadron Collider), medical physics and radiation oncology. In our initial cohort of 109 men treated with curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, daily image guidance computed tomography (CT) scans have been used to calculate delivered dose to the rectum, as distinct from planned dose, using an automated approach. Clinical toxicity data have been collected, allowing us to address the hypothesis that delivered dose provides a better predictor of toxicity than planned dose.

Parent project: 
VoxTox
Publication type: 
Article
Publication year: 
2017

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